PAA-Practical Applied Arts also known as Please Anticipate Accidents

With my first teaching contract, three of the classes I was assigned were Practical Applied Arts. The school I am at is great because it has a large woodworking shop, welding supplies, a full home ec room complete with three stations, and administration who was willing to help as needed. All of this is great…except I know nothing about PAA. I mean I took PAA in middle school, and I am very knowledgeable  about the school, but throughout the whole experience I felt completely out of my comfort zone.

My goal for the classes was that I would never have two classes based out of the same area, this would prevent any arguments about who is responsible for cleaning what, and anyone wrecking someone else’s work. In theory the plan is great…in reality this plan rarely worked. I started with having my PAA 30 class finishing the projects they started with their former teacher in the woodworking shop. PAA 9 was going to start with cooking, while the PAA 10 class did drafting. The biggest problem with this was that PAA 9 could not handle the responsibility of  cooking for more than 2 weeks, and the 10s did not take drafting seriously. Realizing a change of pace was needed I decided to go way out of my comfort zone…and guilt my dad, who is a welding instructor at Moose Jaw Sask Polytech, into teaching welding for a week, followed by three other experienced welders into coming in for two following consecutive weeks to help facilitate the actual welding. This means that I had to get all the supplies for welding, and contact people and actually have a general idea what was going on in the shop. Since I was offering this to one class, I figured that I would offer it to all classes. That was until the grade 10s complained so much two weeks in  that I cut their short, and decided to switch them to baking. I felt throughout the whole semester that I was changing the units every time the students started to get difficult. Part of this was to keep them entertained, part of it was to keep myself sane, and part of it was to keep the rest of the staff happy as I seemed to always be in the way.

During my time teaching PAA I took on the following projects,

PAA 30

  1. individual woodworking projects
  2. welding pencil holders
  3. Group woodworking creation
  4. Cooking
  5. building a shed

PAA 10

  1. drafting
  2. welding pencil holders
  3. baking
  4. CO2 cars
  5. cooking

PAA 9

  1. cooking
  2. welding pencil holders
  3. CO2 cars
  4. wildlife management

During the units, many things happened that I was not prepared for, like having 4 drafting sticks be broken by other students, which halted my drafting unit for a few classes while I found more. I was not prepared for regularly blowing the breakers during my welding unit, or to have a valve leakage which means by oxy-acetylene welding was going to be only stick and mig welding. Every class I got to face an unanticipated situation, some caused by students, some caused by equipment, and some caused from me still figuring things out. Teaching students to respond to accidents that happen while working with tools and dangerous equipment, was one of the lessons I value most, because while you hope that a student will never have to deal with a dangerous situation as a result of human error or faulty equipment.

With every class I learnt something new, with every class I wondered what I was doing, and at the end of every unit I figured out what I liked, what I hated, and how I would do it differently. Even though I started having no idea what I was doing, I actually enjoyed what I was doing. I would be quite happy teaching PAA again, and actually look forward to having the opportunity.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s